Replicating Digital Work

There has been something that I’ve been fascinated by for a long time now and that is how people do the things they do using the internet.

The area that I am interested in most as someone who works in tech is the order in which people hit keys on a keyboard and click their mouse.

Every day billions of people do things with computers that result in an outcome. I’m using the word outcome here as obviously there are a lot of actions taken online that we won’t be interested in or want to know about!

But, putting those ones aside there are billions of actions that we would love to know about and even dare I say it, copy.

These days, the way to find out how something is done is to go to your favourite search engine and type in what it is you’re looking for. The result, usually millions of results across kindly ranked in order of what the search engine thinks will be the most valuable answer.

The next step on the most part is to click the top link or the one you feel represents your answer the best and then start consuming the content.

For people who work with technology and software products in general, a lot of time is spent interacting with tools in a very specific way to get the desired outcome. This can range from sending an email, creating an item in a CRM, writing a line of code or building an automation to remove a manual process from your day.


Now while a chasm exists between the outcomes of the unique combination of keys pressed and mouse buttons clicked, software and access to the open internet presents everyone with exactly the same opportunity. I want to caveat this by saying that there are obvious exceptions to this. The main one being the cost of access to the platform in monetary terms. But, for those who type and click in the most creative can generate life-changing outcomes.

Documenting Repeatable Processes

Want the good news? Everything done online is repeatable and can be easily documented for others to replicate using new tools that have come to market. Standing on top of giants has never been easier.

No-code tools allow non-technical people to build software and automate work without writing code and now through creating documentation detailing how it was done, others can follow along behind you.

Like the best solution becomes consensus online, there are replicable processes of how to do anything online. The blocker is the logging, which until now was a manual process.

So, have a think, what are the things you do everyday online which other people could benefit from?